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FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR

 

 

 

Hi Everyone!

At this writing we are getting ready to go to the Mid-Year Convention in Reno.  I'll be letting you know any new info when I get back. I'm getting excited for St. Patrick's Day! It will all be over by the time you read this.  I hope you all had fun! Garden Grove always does a good job for St. Patrick's Day. A  big thanks to Mickey and Terri for cooking. Our patio sure looks nice. We always get compliments on the plants and Darlene's mural. The Boys Scouts also enjoyed it! The Scouts came and presented us with a plaque and a big "Thank you" for supporting them. Brad Pearce will be our liaison with the scouts and let us know what Quinn and his troop need and how we can help. Both of my boys are Eagle Scouts and we spent many years involved with scouting. It's a good organization. Congratulations to Bridget and the Youth Awareness team. Garden Grove sponsored all 3 finalists! I believe Garden Grove sponsored more students than anyone in the California/Nevada.  Read Bridget's article for more information and names. I'm proud of our lodge for always stepping up to support all youth whether it's Scouts, Little League, Cheer Leading or Youth Awareness. Thanks to the current year officers. We will install new board on April 29th. Come out and support them.
See you around the lodge,

Your Admininstrator, Keith

 

FROM THE GOVERNOR

Hello Everybody,

I had a great time at the California/Nevada Moose Association Conference in Reno. If you are interested in hearing the latest Moose News, join us at the LOOM General Meeting this month (Check your Moose Bulletin Calendar). I hope you enjoyed the St. Pat’s Day Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner. All LOOM members … please come to the lodge and vote for your new officers for the 2017-2018 Moose Year on April 12, 3-6PM. Please, don’t forget to bring your Moose Membership Card. 

John Darling

Governor

 

 

 

APRIL LOOM MEETINGS

April 5th (Wed.)

 

House Committee Meeting 6:00 P.M.

Calendar Make-up Meeting

 

April 12th (Wed.)

 

LOOM Officer 2017-2018  Election 3:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.

LOOM General Meeting 6:00 P.M.

Garden Grove Legion Meeting to follow

 

April 26th (Wed.)

LOOM Orientation Meeting 6:00 P.M.

 

Thank You

I want to thank everyone who helped make our Annual Craft Fair a success. An extra great big hand goes out to all of the vendors, John Darling, Zach Gruis, Judy Duerr, Jessica Brooks, Julie Sorenson, Shannon McCracken, Tom Maxwell, Jennifer Martell, Ruth Espinoza, Ralph Rampley and the LOOM. I hope the vendors did well and that everyone had fun!  STEPHANIE

MOOSE VETERANS AFFAIRS

The Moose fraternity has now embraced the Men and Women who are military veterans. This new program is to honor and help our lodge veterans. There is a 3 ring binder at the back of our lodge where you can add your military information. This is strictly voluntary, and not required.

Thank you..

Leonard Chapman,Veterans Affairs Chairman

 

ATTENTION ALL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS!!
Do you plan on going to college? The Moose can help!!!
Youth Awareness Conference!
November 12th, 9:00-3:00
Come enjoy the day and learn how to earn a chance at receiving
 
Four-day all-expenses paid round trip to the
International Youth Awareness Congress in Kenosha, Wisconsin
and one of five scholarships awarded.-
$12,000, $8,000, $5,000, $3,000, and $2,000.
Our Lodge, Chapter or Legion, will sponsor you
and pay the $35.00 registration fee
.You must be pre-registered! No Walk in's.
  Space is limited.
Please contact Bridget Robinson  at
714-394-4910 or e-mail at
chapter1117@mooseunits.org
before November 7th. 


Thank You

I want to thank Mark Klein & Donna, Rick Balthazar & Debbie, Keith & Bridget, Sunny, Jan, Sue Kiler for the get well cards.Thank You Keith & Bridget for the beautiful note that you wrote me. Also, for all the calls you made to see how I was doing. I also want to thank Tom Wallick who also called the house just about every day to see if we needed anything and to see how I was doing. I also want to say THANKS to the WOTM & LOOM for the card with so many names on it. Thanks again everybody. Love ALL of you.

IRENE JAMIESON

Thank You

Thank you to everyone who came out to Celebrate Keith and his new appointment as Deputy Supreme Governor! A special thank you to Linda Either, Pat and Chuck DeValle, Kandi Knudson and Greg Miller, Jennifer Robinson, Brad Robinson, Jessica Brooks, Mike Fluman, Aaron Johnson, Carol Toozer, Rod McCain and Jerry Fox. You each worked a different part, some before the event, some during and some after. Thank you for helping me put my vision into place, from food to floor plan. I appreciate each and everyone of you!!! 

Sincerely, Bridget

Thank You

I would like to give huge thanks to Paula Shimizu, Joan Hilliker, Anne Pena, Patrick Norton, Peggy Mahoney and Marian Thompson for their generous donation of the ingredients to make the shrimp and sausage boil for my event in September. Way to be great Moose members guys!!! I also want to thank Kandice Knudson and Judy Duerr for helping me with food prep, serving and clean-up. And thank you John Darling for helping with dishes and Aaron Johnson for supplying the cornhole game. You all rock and are the greatest friends! Stephanie

 

Thanks to Frank Di Fatta for donating a four drawer file cabinet to the Chapter and to Mickey for delivering it. The teamwork is greatly appreciated!!

Senior Regent- Rose

 

I want to thank all who participated in the Chinese Auction, you made it great! Thanks to the crew, Judy, Diana, Jessica, Stephanie, Bruce and Bill, you guys were great.

DARLENE GREER

 

Thanks to our Bingo crew, who always do a great job!  KEITH

 

 

I would like to thank everyone who supported me with my Chicken N dumpling dinner. I also want to thank my cooking crew,  Antoinette Muse, Jennie Robinson, Carol Toozer, and Stephanie N Estella McConnell/Cruz, Without their help I never could have done it.  I also would like to thank our Sr. Regent, Rose Agamy for the help with the paperwork.  I hope to see you all again on July 22nd for my Shepherd Pie. 

 

 

#1 Thank you to everyone who donated to the Food Drive. Your donations helped many families in our area through the help of our neighbors at Living Springs Church. #2 Thank you to everyone who made 2015 a wonderful year by taking time to volunteer! And a very special thank you to our administrator and all of the officers that put in so much time and hard work, to provide events and make our lodge a special place! Our lodge wouldn't be what it is without all of you!

Bridget

 

A big thanks to Keith Robinson, Bradley Robinson, Leonard Chapman, Jim Jamieson, and Rick and Debbie Balthazar (from La Habra Moose), for the wonderful Veterans Celebration! It was truly heart warming. And thank you to all who attended and shared.

Thank You From The Southern California Girls

The Southern California Girls Ritual Team would like to thank everyone who came out to play Texas Hold 'em and help support our team in getting to Nashville. The Southern California Girls (Karen, Marianne, Edith and Bridget), won 1st place at the International Ritual Competition. The team was very proud to represent and bring the 1st place award back to California, Our Districts, Lodges and Chapters. Thank you to Garden Grove and El Monte LOOM for allowing us to use the hall, for what seemed like endless practices. We couldn't have achieved anything without your support! Fraternally Yours, The Southern California Girls

 

Thank You From Mary Jane

HI, I WANT TO THANK ALL OF YOU FOR BEING THERE WITH ME AT MY BIRTHDAY PARTY. SPECIAL THANKS TO SHIM FORTHE BEAUTIFUL GOURMET ITALIAN FOOD, AND TO ALL OF MY FOUR CHILDREN WHO ARRANGED THIS WONDERFUL GET TOGETHER FOR ME. ALL THE GIFTS WERE SO NICE AND THE FLOWERS ARE ALL SO BEAUTIFUL, WHEN WE GOT THEM ALL IN MY LITTLE MOBILE,I FELT LIKE I WAS LAID OUT IN THE FUNERAL HOME, THIS WAS SO MUCH BETTER TO HAVE A LIVE MEMORIAL THEN THE OTHER KIND, I GOT TO ENJOY ALL MY FRIENDS NOW. I GUESS THEY WORKED A LONG TIME TO GET THIS GOING.  I AM OVERWHELMED THAT SO MANY FRIENDS CAME TO SHARE THIS JOY WITH ME, AND SOME EVEN  GAVE MY LITTLE DAISY A GIFT ALSO, SO THOUGHTFUL.  I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT DAY. THANK EACH AND EVERYONE ONCE AGAIN, FOR THE TIME OF MY LIFE.  MY MOM HAD NEVER EVER GIVEN ME A BIRTHDAY PARTY, SO I CONSIDER THIS AN HONOR. I  REALLY HAVE SOMETHING TO REMEMBER. THANK ALL OF YOU FOR BEING MY DEAR FRIENDS, I LOVE U ALL.FINALLY, I WOULD LIKE TO THANK DARLENE, JUDY, DIANA, PATTY, JERRY, & GARY FOR ALL THEIR HELP.

 MARY JANE STAUBER WELLEVER AND MISS DAISY....♥♥

 

 

 

Moose International Membership Campaign 2016-2017

"MOOSE - RAISE THE ROOF"

 

   

  “MOOSE - Raise The Roof” in 2016 -2017

Membership campaigns are created and implemented by the Membership Department at Moose International. Annual Membership Campaigns typically run from May 1 to April 30 and have a unique theme each year.

This year’s Annual Membership Campaign is Moose – Raise the Roof, which runs from May 1, 2016 to April 30, 2017. Last year we focused on growing our Lodges and Chapters – our foundation – in order to support our core values. Now it’s time to build on that success and push above those levels so that our communities can hear our celebration loud and clear.

 

 

 

 

CNMA LOOM MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN

SEPTEMBER 9, 2016 - AUGUST 31, 2017

"MONEY FOR MEMBERS"

 

 

 

 

CNMA  MEMBERSHIP RETENTION PROGRAM

2016 -  2017

 

 

 

 

LOOM General Laws (PDF)

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    GARDEN GROVE OFFICERS
2016 - 2017
LOOM 620

GOVERNOR John Darling
JR PAST GOVERNOR J. R. Rogers
JR GOVERNOR Gary Lang
PRELATE Leonard Chapman
TREASURER Mike Fluman
ADMINISTRATOR Keith Robinson
3 YEAR TRUSTEE Dailey Andrews
2 YEAR TRUSTEE Greg Miller
1 YEAR TRUSTEE Chuck DeValle
SGT AT ARMS Dailey Andrews

 

 

 

 LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE

 

STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN

MOOSE CHARITIES Leonard Chapman
AUDITING  
MEMBERSHIP Jerry Fox
APPLICATION REVIEW Chuck DeValle
HEART OF THE COMMUNITY Leonard Chapman
LOSS PREVENTION Saul Mora
COMMUNICATIONS Boake Shimizu
GOVERNMENT  RELATIONS John Darling
ACTIVITIES Greg Miller
MOOSE LEGION Leonard Chapman
   

 

 

 

   PILGRIMS

 

Jim Jamieson  

 

 

 

FELLOWS

 

William Bull Marlyn Graham James Roy
Rick Chandler Michael Homiak Sr. Jose Sanchez
Leonard Chapman Jim Jamieson Boake Shimizu
Sam Cordaro Mike Kuhl Chuck VanHouten
John Darling Sam Mead  
Charles DeValle Keith Robinson  
Kurt Fury J. R. Rogers  
     

 

 

 

25 CLUB MEMBERS

William Bull Aaron Johnson James Roy
John Darling Edwin Johnson Chuck VanHouten
Charles DeValle Jim Johnston ** Brian Weld
Kurt Fury Rob Main  
Marlyn Graham ** Sam Mead **  
Michael Homiak Sr. Keith Robinson**  
Jim Jamieson ****    

 ** 50 Division ***75 Division ****100 Division *****125 Division

 

 

 

What Are Your Responsibilities As an Officer: The Lodge GOVERNOR


The Governor is the President of the corporation that the Lodge legally exists as. He presides at all meetings of the Board of Officers, all regular meetings, and any specially scheduled meetings of the Lodge. The Governor’s primary objective is to promote the fraternal operation of the Lodge. His major specific responsibilities include:

 

Maintaining order and decorum at meetings, ensuring that meetings are run according to Robert’s Rules of Order.

 

Appointing certain designated officers and the chairmen of all standing and special committees, except as otherwise provided in the

General Laws; also to ensure the continuing activity of committees by appointing replacements as needed.

 

Chairing the House Committee. He is NOT—and cannot be—the manager of the Social Quarters. He has no authority over the Social Quarters, except when he is presiding at a House Committee meeting.

 

 

 

MOOSE MEMBERS MUST EARN TOP DEGREES OF ORDER

One of the basic precepts of the Loyal Order of Moose is that "no institution that labors for self and self alone can remain great and mighty, and serve posterity." Therefore, the two highest degrees conferred on members of the Moose Fraternity are bestowed as a reward for devotion and service to the philanthropic programs of the Order. These are the Fellowship Degree and the Pilgrim Degree of Merit.

When a man is enrolled into the Loyal Order of Moose, he automatically becomes a member of the first degree, and becomes eligible for advancement to the Second Degree, the Moose Legion.

Once enrolled as a Moose Legionnaire, he is eligible to wear the maroon Moose Legion blazer, striped tie and lapel pin, and to participate in the celebrations and other activities of his Moose Legion Unit.

If a member has demonstrated his leadership ability by giving of his time and effort to serve on various Lodge and/or Moose Legion committees and by being a loyal, enthusiastic and active member of his Lodge and Moose Legion, he may be granted the honors of the third degree--the Fellowship Degree of Honor.

He is then able to wear the Fellowship regalia and the Fellowship lapel pin. Conferral of the Fellowship Degree takes place at the International Moose Convention and at state and provincial association conventions and authorized special meetings.

The first full week in December is set aside each year as "Fellowship Degree Honor Week," and all Lodges throughout the Moose domain are requested to conduct appropriate activities to pay tribute to their members of the third degree.

The highest and most coveted degree of the Order, the Pilgrim Degree of Merit, is conferred on roughly 150 to 200 Moose members each year, and only once a year, in a solemn and impressive ceremony held in late May or early June in the House of God on the Mooseheart campus.

Only those who have compiled an outstanding record of meritorious service to the Order over a period of many years receive this distinction. Pilgrims are entitled to wear the gold Pilgrim jacket and tie, and the Pilgrim lapel pin.

One of the most colorful rituals in the Moose is the Pilgrim regalia presentation ceremony. When a new Pilgrim is named, his home Lodge sponsors a ceremony in which Pilgrims in the area convene in their regalia to invest him with his Pilgrim apparel. Some larger Moose Associations have received permission to “present” all of their year’s Pilgrims at one time, in a statewide ceremony.

The regalia of the Moose Legion, Fellowship Degree of Honor, and Pilgrim Degree of Merit can be worn at any authorized Moose function--but must be worn in their entirety; it is improper to wear a degree jacket without its correlating necktie, or vice versa.

Members of the Fellowship Degree and Pilgrim Degree are recognized throughout the Moose organization as fraternal leaders because they have earned the respect of their brother Moose by their service to the Order.

 

 

 

25 CLUBBERS ARE MOOSE "MEN OF DISTINCTION"

Membership in the "25 Club" of the Loyal Order of Moose is attained by sponsoring a minimum of 25 candidates for membership in the Moose fraternity.

The 25 Club was organized at the 1940 International Convention of the Order at Des Moines, Iowa, to give recognition to Moose members who have given that "extra effort" to keep the fraternity strong and growing.

To date, more than 75,000 members have qualified for membership in this coveted organization and more members attain this level each month.

A new 25 Clubber receives a gold 25 Club lapel pin with a silver inset Moose head. As he sponsors more candidates, the member advances to the 50 Division and earns a diamond in his pin; upward to the 75, 100, 150, 175, 200, 250 Divisions and beyond, he earns additional diamonds in his pin. Upon reaching the 250 Division, the member is presented a Life Membership in the fraternity. Upon reaching the 500 Division, he retains his pin for life and his presented with a solid gold 25 Club ring. A quality diamond is added to that ring for each 100 members sponsored thereafter, up to fully 25 diamonds in the ring upon reaching the 3,000 Division.

As of the beginning of the 21st century, only three individuals had ever reached the stratospheric 3,000 Division: the late Sam Trowbridge of Seattle, WA Lodge 211, the all-time champion Moose sponsor with 4,824 members; the late Jack Burns of Phoenix, AZ Lodge 708, who sponsored 3,156; and the late William T. Arnold of Sebring, FL Lodge 2259, who died in 2002 with 3,926 members to his credit.

This is not the only recognition extended to 25 Clubbers for their extraordinary efforts on behalf of the fraternity. Each year, a special 25 Club party is held by the state associations, and one of the highlights of the International Convention is the elaborate party, usually featuring top-name entertainment for new and qualifying 25 Clubbers.

In each issue, generally two pages of Moose Magazine are devoted to the "Order Salutes the 25 Club," in which pictures of new members of the 25 Club are printed, and those rising to higher divisions are mentioned

 

 

 

THE MOOSE FRATERNITY: A LEADER IN COMMUNITY SERVICE

 

By compiling an exemplary record of community service, the Loyal Order of Moose has earned an outstanding reputation as one of America's leading fraternal and service organizations.

 

Community activities in Moose Lodges are intended to supplement the humanitarian services that limited government resources can't provide.

 

Every one of the more than 2,000 Lodges is urged to participate in a "Six-Point Program" outlined by the fraternity's Community Service Department. These six areas of concentration include:


     1. Youth Awareness / Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.)


     2. Youth Sports


     3. Scouting and Yellowstone YCC


     4. Senior Citizens/Moosehaven/Food & Shelter


     5. Mooseheart


     6. Local Volunteer Services

 

Perhaps the most prominent point of the "Six-Point Program of Community Service is the Moose Youth Awareness program, in which hundreds of bright, enthusiastic teenagers are recruited each year and then guided to create and deliver their own distinctive "KidsTalk" presentations to help younger children make positive, healthy choices in life. The teenagers present these "KidsTalks" to groups ranging from ages four to nine. Every year, Moose “KidsTalk” reaches up to 100,000 youngsters across the U.S. and Canada. Dedicated to the betterment of humanity, the Moose fraternity has also actively supported national health endowments throughout its history. These have included the Kidney Foundation, Muscular Dystrophy, American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, Cerebral Palsy, Arthritis Foundation, Epilepsy Foundation, and the Alzheimer's Association.

 

Special emphasis is placed on Community Service activities for youth. The Moose is an active participant in youth Special Olympics, as well as youth baseball, softball, basketball, hockey and soccer.

 

Hundreds of Lodges are charter sponsors in local Boy and Girl Scouting groups. The key to the success of any Scouting troop is leadership. Moose members are active leaders in local Scouting programs, building the future leaders of your community. Moose sponsorship of Scouting includes Lodges that are chartered partners with a Boy Scout unit or provides financial support for Boy and Girl Scout units. It also provide for Lodge donations of $50 or more in a fiscal quarter to the Scouting programs a Mooseheart.

 

Youths are also served by the Moose fraternity’s complete financial underwriting of the Youth Conservation Corps program at Yellowstone National Park. Every summer, YCC gives selected youths from all over the continent (including at least four from Mooseheart and three more from Moose families) an unforgettable eight-week work/learn/earn opportunity in the vast beauty of America’s premier national park.

Other Moose-sponsored projects include "Adopt-A-Highway," "Meals on Wheels," and feeding the homeless, and sometimes, housing them temporarily in the wake of natural disasters or other emergencies. . Years ago, Moose "Youth Honor Day" played an important role in reducing vandalism on Halloween night. "Operation Santa Claus," in which Lodges collect toys and distribute them to needy children, has been responsible for providing thousands of children with gifts at Christmas. Additionally, most Lodges sponsor more locally-tailored projects designed to fit the needs of the area in which it is located.

Counting volunteer hours worked, personal miles driven, and monetary donations, Moose men and women contribute nearly $90 million annually in Community Service donations throughout North America. Lodges everywhere are making substantial contributions to society by providing the initiative, organization, and manpower to make our communities better places to live.

 

 

 

THE MOOSE FRATERNITY


Although the Moose fraternal organization was founded in the late 1800s with the modest goal of offering men an opportunity to gather socially, it was reinvented, during the first decade of the 20 th century, into an organizational dynamo of men and women who would set out to build a city that would brighten the futures of thousands of children in need all across North America; then, less than a decade later, another, more compact community that would furnish comfort, dignity and security during the golden years of the dependent elderly among its membership.

When Dr. John Henry Wilson, a Louisville, Kentucky physician, organized a handful of men into what was dubbed the Loyal Order of Moose in the parlor of his home in April 1888, he and his compatriots did so apparently for no other reason than to form a string of men’s social clubs.  Lodges were instituted in Cincinnati, St. Louis, and the smaller Indiana towns of Crawfordsville and Frankfort by the early 1890s, but Dr. Wilson himself became disillusioned at some unpleasant dissension with the fraternal ranks, and he left the infant order shortly before the turn of the 20 th century.

It was just the two remaining Indiana Lodges that kept the Moose from disappearing altogether, until the fall of 1906, when the outgoing young city clerk of Elwood, Indiana, one James John Davis, was invited to enroll into the Crawfordsville Lodge. It was on Davis’ 33 rd birthday, October 27, that he became just the 247 th member of the Loyal Order of Moose.

Davis, a native of Wales who had worked from boyhood as an “iron puddler” in the steel mills of Pennsylvania, had also been a labor organizer. Knowing that moose in the wild were large, powerful animals that used their size and strength not as predators but as protectors of their young and weak, Davis immediately saw potential for human Moose to build great size and strength, to protecting their own as well.  A much larger, more powerful Loyal Order of Moose could, he envisioned, provide security for a largely working-class membership.

In 1906 America, little or no government “safety net” yet existed to provide benefits to the wife and children of a breadwinner who died or became disabled. So Davis proposed to “pitch” Moose membership as a way to provide such protection to the workingman at a bargain price— annual dues of just $5 to $10. The leadership of the moribund Order happily gave him a green light and the title of “Supreme Organizer,” and Davis set out with a few well- chosen colleagues to solicit members and to organize Moose Lodges across the United States and southern Canada.

Davis’ marketing instincts were on-target: By 1912, in just six years, the Order had multiplied, from 247 members in two Lodges, to a colossus of nearly 500,000 in more than 1,000 Lodges! Davis by now was appointed the organization’s first chief executive with the new title of Director General, realized that it was time to make good on the promise he had envisioned.  The Moose first began a program of paying “sick benefits” to members who became too ill to work—and, more ambitiously, Davis, along with Supreme Secretary Rodney Brandonand other Moose officers, laid plans for a “Moose Institute,” to be centrally located somewhere in the Midwest, that would provide a home, schooling and vocational training to children of deceased Moose members.

The Birth of Mooseheart. After careful consideration of numerous sites, the Moose Supreme Council in late 1912 approved the purchase of what was known as the Brookline Farm—more than 1,000 acres along the then-dirt-surfaced Lincoln Highway, between Batavia and Aurora on the west side of the Fox River, about 40 miles west of Chicago.  Ohio Congressman John Lentz, a member of the Supreme Council, conceived the name “Mooseheart” for the new community: “This,” he said, “will always be the place where the Moose fraternity will collectively pour out its heart; its devotion and sustenance, to the children of its members in need.”

So it was on a hot summer Sunday, July 27, 1913, that several thousand Moose men and women (for the Women of the Moose received formal recognition that year as the organization’s official female component) gathered under a rented circus tent toward the south end of the new property, and ceremonially placed the cornerstone for Mooseheart. The first 11 youngsters in residence were present, having been admitted earlier that month; they and a handful of workers were housed in the original farmhouse and a few rough-hewn frame buildings that had been erected that spring.  

Addressing Need on the Other End of Life: Moosehaven. Mooseheart’s construction proceeded furiously over the next decade, but it only barely kept pace with admissions that swelled the student census to nearly 1,000 by 1920. (Mooseheart’s population would reach a peak of 1,300 during the depths of the Great Depression; housing was often “barracks” style—unacceptable by today’s standards. Mooseheart officials now consider the campus’ ultimate capacity at between 400 and 500.)

Still, by the beginning of the Twenties, Davis and his Moose colleagues thought that the fraternity could and should do more—this time for aged members who were having trouble making ends meet in retirement. A limited number of elderly members had been invited to live amid the children at Mooseheart since 1915, but within a few years it was realized that this was not a practical long-term solution.

After another round of site consideration, 26 acres of riverside property was purchased just south of  Jacksonville, Florida, and in the fall of 1922, Moosehaven, the “City of Contentment,” was opened, with the arrival of its first 22 retired Moose residents.  Moosehaven has since grown into a 63-acre community, providing comfortable housing, a wide array of recreational activities, and comprehensive health care to more than 400 residents.

Meanwhile, as the Moose fraternity was growing in visibility and influence, so was Jim Davis. President Warren G. Harding named him to his Cabinet as Secretary of Labor in 1921, and Davis continued in that post under Presidents Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover as well. In November 1930, Davis, a Republican, won election to the U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania, and he served there with distinction for the next 14 years. As both Labor Secretary and U.S. Senator, Davis was known as a conservative champion of labor, who fought hard for the bargaining rights of unions—but who felt that the workingman should expect no “handouts” of any sort. In the Senate, it was Davis who spearheaded passage of landmark legislation to force building contractors to pay laborers “prevailing” union-level wages in any government construction work. The law would forever bear his name: The Davis-Bacon Act.

An Independent, Autonomous Women’s Component.Though the Women of the Moose (originally termed the Women of Mooseheart Legion) had received formal recognition as a Moose auxiliary in 1913, they at first had little structured program of their own beyond the Chapter level.  That changed in 1921, when Davis met and hired a remarkable woman named Katherine Smith.

When the 19 th Amendment had granted women the right to vote in 1920, Smith, from Indianapolis, reasoned that women in politics would be a “growth market.”  She quit her secretarial job to go to work in Warren Harding’s successful Presidential campaign—and, still in her 20s, was rewarded with an appointment as Director of Public Employment in Washington.  In that post, her boss was Secretary of  Labor James J. Davis.  

Davis immediately recognized Smith’s talent and drive, but it took him five years to convince her to quit her government job and go to work for him running the Women of the Moose.  A stereotypical “women’s program” held no interest for her, Smith protested.  “So get out there and make a program,” Davis retorted.  She did exactly that, as the organization’s first Grand Chancellor, for the next 38 years until her retirement in 1964, at which point the Women of the Moose boasted 250,000 members.  (It has since grown to more than 540,000, in approximately 1,800 Chapters.)

As Davis committed more time and energy to his Washington duties in the 1920s and beyond, he had less time to run the Moose fraternity.  In 1927 the day-to-day management of the Order’s business was assumed at Mooseheart by Malcolm R. Giles, in the office of Supreme Secretary.  Giles, an accountant who had worked fulltime for the Moose since 1915, set out to implement a reorganization of the fraternity’s finances, and in 1934 modernized its recruitment apparatus into a formal Membership Enrollment Department, under the direction of a gregarious and talented young man named Paul P.  Schmitz.

Davis’ health was uncertain as he left the Senate in early 1945, and he settled into an elder statesman’s role with the Moose.  He collapsed on the podium while addressing the Moose convention in August 1947, and died that November.  Giles continued  to run the organization’s business as he had for 20 years; in 1949, the Supreme council granted him the title of Director General.

The “Proof of our Value:” Community Service. For a quarter-century the Moose had directed its efforts solely toward Mooseheart and Moosehaven; now, with postwar prosperity driving male Moose membership to nearly 800,000 members, Director General Giles set out to broaden the organization’s horizons.  In 1949 he conceived and instituted what was to become the third great Moose endeavor of the modern era, the Civic Affairs program (later renamed Community Service).

Giles explained his rationale thusly:  “Only three institutions have a God-given right to exist in a community—the home, the church and the school.  The rest of us must be valuable to the community to warrant our existence—and the burden of proof of our value is on us.”  The Community Service program has since flourished into a myriad of humanitarian efforts on the local Lodge level, as well as fraternity-wide projects such as the Moose Youth Awareness Program, in which bright teenagers go into elementary schools, daycare centers and the like to communicate an anti-drug message to 4-to 9-year olds—as many as 100,000 every year.

Malcolm Giles’ term as Director General was cut short when he suffered a heart attack and died, at age  59, in September 1953.  He was replaced on an interim basis by J.  Jack Stoehr, the well-respected Director of the fraternity’s most successful geographic region, which included Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.  For a permanent successor, the Order turned to the commanding presence of Schmitz, the Membership Director who in 19 years had nurtured the fraternity from a low of 240,000 members during the worst of the Great Depression, to nearly 900,000 by the early 1950s.  

Schmitz, an Aurora, Illinois, native, led the Moose for nearly 21 years, longer than anyone except Davis.  During the tenure, both the Mooseheart and Moosehaven physical plants received substantial modernization, and he guided the Moose smoothly through the tumultuous 1960s into the 1970s with continued steady membership growth, to more than 1 million men (in more than 2,000 Lodges) and 300,000 women before he retired in April 1974.

Schmitz turned over the Director General’s office to Herbert W. Heilman—the first time a Mooseheart graduate (Class of 1934) had risen to lead the organization that had raised him at its Child City.  Heilman, a teacher and athletic coach originally from Tiffin, Ohio, had been hired by Giles in 1948 to run the fraternity’s sports program, thenhad worked for 17 years as Membership Enrollment Director under Schmitz.  Heilman’s tenure saw men’s and women’s combined Moose membership rise to nearly 1.8 million before his retirement in January 1984.

 When Paul J. O’Hollaren, a lawyer and insurance executive from Portland, Oregon, became the Supreme Council’s choice to succeed Heilman, it was the first time since Davis that a non-employee had assumed the Director General’s chair.  O’Hollaren had, of course, been a active Moose for a quarter-century: charter Governor of his Lodge in 1958, President of the Oregon Moose Association, Chief Justice of the Supreme Forum, and, in 1978-79, Supreme Governor.

Director General O’Hollaren’s whirlwind decade in office saw a full computerization and modernization of the fraternity’s business operations; the change of its corporate name to Moose International; the stirring observances of the organization’s Centennial in 1988, a completely updated redesign of the fraternity’s ceremonial degree regalia (away from headgear and robes to distinctive color-coded blazers and neckties); a rebuilding of Mooseheart’s utilities infrastructure, and the start of a long-range construction program to completely renovate or build new residential space for every Mooseheart student and Moosehaven resident.

O’Hollaren retired in February 1994; his successor, Director General Frank A. Sarnecki, also came to chief executive post out of the Moose “volunteer corps.” Sarnecki, a real estate and insurance executive from New Jersey, served as Secretary of the Perth Amboy Lodge for 12 years in the 1960s and ‘70s; he rose to become Supreme Governor in 1988-89.  During his five years in office, Sarnecki guided the fraternity toward sweeping changes – a fully equitable relationship between its men’s and women’s components in admissions to Moosehaven and in Lodge facilities that have been re- dubbed “Moose Family Centers”; a fraternity-wide effort to fund a new $16 million LifeCare Complex at Moosehaven; and, an expansion of Mooseheart admissions to accept applications from all children in need—a move that inspired renowned ABC Radio commentator Paul Harvey to refer to efforts of the Moose Family Fraternity, in an August 1994 broadcast to his 24 million listeners throughout North America, as “a dynamic demonstration of civilized man’s better self.”

In April 1999, Frank Sarnecki resigned as Director General to pursue business interests back home on the east coast; after a period of weeks in which Paul O’Hollaren returned to run Moose International operations on an interim basis, longtime Supreme Secretary Donald Ross was elevated by the Supreme Council to become the fraternity’s eighth Director General on June 15, 1999.  Although Ross was a 28-year career Moose staff officer at the time of his appointment, he also was, at age 49, the organization’s youngest chief executive in more than 75 years.

 

 

 

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